The View of Our Galaxy from Space

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Awe-inspiring shot of the Milkyway Galaxy from the International Space Station.

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Jupiter Structural Layer Cake

CooI Stuff & Nonsense

Jupiter Cake Perfection

Cakecrumbs

When I posted the Earth cake, I did not expect it to get anywhere near the amount of attention it received. Getting featured on the Facebook pages Think Geek and I Fucking Love Science was a total highlight of my blogging life. I’m big fans of both pages so it was kind of surreal. A lot of my Zoology graduate mates are also fans of IFLS and you’d often hear conversations in the Masters office beginning with, “Did you see that post by IFLS today?” So I woke up to several of them messaging me about it and we all got super excited over it.

With the exposure those pages brought came a whole lot of people who wanted to know how to make it. I still get a couple of emails a week asking for a recipe. The cake was a total experiment on my part, and not…

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NASA Spacecraft ‘Wakes Up’ Near Pluto, 2.9 Billion Miles From Earth

News

After a voyage of nearly nine years and three billion miles —the farthest any space mission has ever traveled to reach its primary target – NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft came out of hibernation today for its long-awaited 2015 encounter with the Pluto system,” NASA announced in a statement on Saturday December 6.

I saw a rocket launch, and now I’m in love with NASA (The Verge)

News

On January 20th, I witnessed my very first rocket launch — an Atlas V rocket punching into space to drop a communications satellite for the US Navy into orbit 22,000 miles above Earth. That required about 2.5 million pounds of thrust: a very large explosion that must be precisely controlled in order to be successful. It’s not as ambitious as the things that are coming next, but I found it awe-inspiring all the same. Read and see more at The Verge .

Light Shines 2015 MSH 11-62

News

Light shines on new views: The year of 2015 has been declared the International Year of Light (IYL) by the United Nations. Organizations, institutions, and individuals involved in the science and applications of light will be joining together for this yearlong celebration to help spread the word about the wonders of light. In many ways, astronomy uses the science of light. And to celebrate, our Chandra X-ray Observatory released new images. Here’s one of them:

The Winter Shower

CooI Stuff & Nonsense

Mount Changbai, China
Known in the north as a winter meteor shower, the 2014 Geminids rain down on this rugged, frozen landscape. The scene was recorded from the summit of Mount Changbai along China’s northeastern border with North Korea as a composite of digital frames capturing bright meteors near the shower’s peak. Orion is near picture center above the volcanic crater lake. The shower’s radiant in the constellation Gemini is to the upper left, at the apparent origin of all the meteor streaks.